Events

Jan
7
Mon
Woven, a raw canvas installation by Eszter Rosta
Jan 7 – Jan 17 all-day

Eszter Rosta's Substance (a) - 2018Fifth year Visual Art student Eszter Rosta’s solo show Woven, explores materiality, physicality, and objecthood in a number of large-scale raw canvas works.

“I want to play with the prominence of the shape through the materials in question and natural pigmentations such as teas, coffee grounds, plants, etc. Furthermore, I also intend to represent the objecthood of the canvas, by showing them for the canvas that it is – the actual fabrication of the material, the complexity of its weaving, and its natural reference to plants, through processes of manipulation and human imprint.

IMAGE: Eszter Rosta’s Substance (a) – 2018

Gallery Hours:
Mon. – Thurs. 10am – 4pm.

Admission is free and all are welcome

 

Jan
21
Mon
Just the Wind, a mixed-media exhibition by Ellen Soule and Liv Paul
Jan 21 – Jan 31 all-day

Liv Paul - Portrait of Ellen, ink drawing Third year Visual Art students Ellen Soule and Liv Paul team up to create and present Just the Wind, a mixed-media exhibition that invites viewers to ask questions about the way they experience fear and trauma.

“It is a well-known expression that most people have encountered when hearing a strange noise that it was “just the wind” rather than an intruder – human, or spectral. Our joint exhibition focuses on the experience of our fears or traumas and how we process them. We want people to connect with a moment they remember hearing the phrase so that they immediately recognize their connection to the works. We hope that people will see their own fears represented in the visualizations of our personal fears, which are common in many people but create different reactions individually. ”

IMAGE: Liv Paul – Portrait of Ellen, ink drawing

Gallery Hours:
Mon. – Thurs. 10am – 4pm.

Admission is free and all are welcome

 

Mar
27
Wed
2019 Wendy Michener Lecture: Anna Maria Tremonti
Mar 27 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

“Dispatches from Inside the Newsroom Revolutions in Journalism and Our Changing World”

Anna Maria TremontiAnna Maria Tremonti is the host of CBC Radio One’s flagship network morning news program, The Current, where she has devoted hours of coverage and questions to issues that range from world politics, to social and demographic shifts to economics. For this memorial lecture, she will draw on her extensive experience as a reporter, a correspondent, and a host to examine the dynamic changes and challenges facing the field of journalism.

Admission is free; all welcome.

The Wendy Michener Lecture, named in commemoration of the Canadian arts critic and journalist, was established at York University in 1986 to provide a forum for discussion of vital issues and developments in culture and the arts.

Apr
17
Wed
emergence: the Digital Media End of Year Show.
Apr 17 – Apr 24 all-day

orange dots in an organic pattern that evokes a flock of birds in flightStudents in York University’s Digital Media Program, offered collaboratively by the Department of Computational Arts in the School of the Arts, Media, Performance & Design and the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in the Lassonde School of Engineering, use code and programming as tools for creative expression. The objects and experiences they create span a wide variety of concepts and formats, including mobile devices, large-scale installations, screen-based projects using single or networked computers, data visualization, games, interactive performance and more.

A special Opening Reception & Performance on April 18th from 6:00 – 9:30 pm.

A curatorial team including representatives from Interaccess and the Toronto Media Arts Centre have selected from some of the most innovative projects created in Digital Media classes during the past academic year for this exhibition.

Schedule:
Thursday April 17th-24th, 2019, 10am–6pm Mon-Fri

Opening: April 18th from 6:00 – 9:30 pm.

Admission is free. All welcome.

May
2
Thu
Public Talk: Torkwase Dyson in the Joan & Martin Goldfarb Summer Institute in Visual Arts
May 2 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

[caption id="attachment_101601" align="alignleft" width="500"]The artist Torkwase Dyson with installation *Nautical Dusk*, 2018. Photo by Gabe Souza courtesy of the Colby Museum of Art. The artist Torkwase Dyson with installation *Nautical Dusk*, 2018. Photo by Gabe Souza courtesy of the Colby Museum of Art.[/caption]

Torkwase Dyson is an interdisciplinary artist based in Brooklyn, New York, United States. Her work has been exhibited at the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Corcoran College of Art and Design, and the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art. She describes the themes of her work as “architecture, infrastructure, environmental justice, and abstract drawing.” In 1999 she received a BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University and her MFA from Yale School of Art in painting/printmaking in 2003. In 2016, Dyson was elected to the board of the Architectural League of New York as Vice President of Visual Arts. In 2017, she was on the faculty of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. She is a visiting critic at Yale School of Art.

 


Exploring the theme of Crossing the Line: Contemporary Extensions of Drawing as a Medium, the 2019 Joan & Martin Goldfarb Summer Institute in Visual Arts comprises a graduate intensive and three public lectures.

The other two public lectures in the series are curator Connie Butler (May 7) at the Art Gallery of Ontario and curator and writer  Kate Macfarlane (May 9) at the Power Plant.

The Summer Institute is named in recognition of Joan and Martin Goldfarb, longstanding supporters of York University’s School of the Arts, Media, Performance & Design, whose generous gift has made this annual residency program possible.

May
7
Tue
Public Talk: Connie Bulter in the Joan & Martin Goldfarb Summer Institute in Visual Arts
May 7 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Connie Butler HeadshotConnie Butler joined the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles as chief curator in 2013. She was chief curator of drawings at MoMA from 2006–2013, where she organized major exhibitions including On Line: Drawing Through the Twentieth Century and Greater New York at MoMA PS1. She served as curator at MOCA from 1996–2006 where she organized the internationally acclaimed exhibition WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution.

Exploring the theme of Crossing the Line: Contemporary Extensions of Drawing as a Medium, the 2019 Joan & Martin Goldfarb Summer Institute in Visual Arts comprises a graduate intensive and three public lectures.

The other two public lectures in the series take place at the Power Plant and feature artist and scholar Torkwase Dyson (May 2) and curator and writer Kate Macfarlane (May 9).

The Summer Institute is named in recognition of Joan and Martin Goldfarb, longstanding supporters of York University’s School of the Arts, Media, Performance & Design, whose generous gift has made this annual residency program possible.

Connie Butler is presented by AGO in collaboration with Crossing the Line: Contemporary Extensions of Drawing as a Medium, the 2019 Joan & Martin Goldfarb Summer Institute of the Department of Visual Art & Art History, York University

May
9
Thu
Kate Macfarlane Acts of Resistance: Choreographic Drawing in the Joan & Martin Goldfarb Summer Institute in Visual Arts
May 9 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

[caption id="attachment_101604" align="alignleft" width="500"]Kate Macfarlane, photo by Dan Weill Kate Macfarlane, photo by Dan Weill[/caption]

ACTS OF RESISTANCE: CHOREOGRAPHIC DRAWING introduces artistic strategies that exploit the salient attributes of drawing whilst resisting its conventions and testing its limits. Works by seven women contemporary artists are considered through the lens of choreography, including Monika Grzymala’s spatial drawings, Aleksandra Mir’s collectively-made murals, Florence Peake’s performances, Kate Davis’s revision of Amedeo Modigliani’s nudes, Kathy Prendergast’s remapping of continental Europe, and figurative drawings by ruby onyinyechi amanze and Nicola Tyson.

Kate Macfarlane is a curator and writer based in London, UK, and is co-founder and co-director of Drawing Room, London. Recent curatorial projects include A Slice through the World: Contemporary Artists’ Drawings (Drawing Room and Modern Art Oxford) 2018; Dove Allouche – Mea Culpa of a Sceptic (The Fondation d’entreprise Ricard, Paris)2016; Line (Lisson Gallery, London) 2016. Recent writing includes: ‘Graphic Witness’ a chapter for The Companion to Contemporary Drawing, Wiley Blackwell (2019); ‘Intimate Reflections’ in Auto Fictions – Contemporary Drawing, Wilhelm-Hack-Museum, Germany (2018).


Exploring the theme of Crossing the Line: Contemporary Extensions of Drawing as a Medium, the 2019 Joan & Martin Goldfarb Summer Institute in Visual Arts comprises a graduate intensive and three public lectures.

The other two public lectures feature artist and scholar Torkwase Dyson (May 2) at the Power Plant and curator Connie Butler (May 7) at the Art Gallery of Ontario.

The Summer Institute is named in recognition of Joan and Martin Goldfarb, longstanding supporters of York University’s School of the Arts, Media, Performance & Design, whose generous gift has made this annual residency program possible.

May
23
Thu
Odette Sculpture Residency: Public lecture Brendan Fernandes
May 23 @ 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

[caption id="attachment_101613" align="alignleft" width="500"]Brendan Fernandes headshot courtesy of The Banff Centre. Photo by Anna Springate-Floch. Brendan Fernandes headshot courtesy of The Banff Centre. Photo by Anna Springate-Floch.[/caption]

NB the start time is 2:30pm, not 2 as previously posted

Chicago-based Visual Art alumnus Brendan Fernandes (BFA ’02) is the 2019 Louis Odette Sculptor-in-Residence at York University. He will be on campus May 6 to 10 and 20 to 24, with a hiatus in between where he installs a work for the 2019 Whitney Biennial. The residency in conjunction with the Intensive Sculpture Workshop, a fourth-year course offered by the Department of Visual Art & Art History which provides a valuable apprenticeship/mentorship experience for students, allowing them to work closely with a renowned artist.

Born in Nairobi, Kenya, Fernandes is a internationally recognized Canadian artist working at the intersection of dance and visual arts. His projects address issues of race, queer culture, migration, protest and other forms of collective movement. Always looking to create new spaces and new forms of agency, Fernandes’ projects take on hybrid forms: part Ballet, part queer dance hall, part political protest…always rooted in collaboration and fostering solidarity.

Fernandes discusses his  recent work in dance, queer politic and contemporary forms of agency and resistance in a public talk. Admission is free and all are welcome. 

The Louis Odette Sculptor-in-Residence program is made possible with the generous support of the P. & L. Odette Charitable Foundation. The program strives to create a dynamic learning environment which supports the advancement of the art of sculpture, and where students benefit from participation in, and observation of, diverse professional studio practices. The residency provides the opportunity for upper-level undergraduate visual arts students to develop an enhanced working understanding of sculpture techniques from the perspective of eminent guest artists.

[caption id="attachment_101614" align="alignleft" width="700"]"I'm Down" 2017 Image credit Monique Meloche Gallery “I’m Down” 2017 Image credit Monique Meloche Gallery[/caption]

[caption id="attachment_101615" align="alignleft" width="700"]"Ballet Kink" 2019 Image courtesy of the Guggenheim Museum. Photography by Scott Rudd Events. “Ballet Kink” 2019 Image courtesy of the Guggenheim Museum. Photography by Scott Rudd Events.[/caption]

[caption id="attachment_101616" align="alignleft" width="700"]"Steady Pulse" 2017 Image credit Monique Meloche Gallery “Steady Pulse” 2017 Image credit Monique Meloche Gallery[/caption]

Sep
30
Mon
X – a collaborative exhibition by Kristen Elizabeth Donoghue-Stanford and Rebecca Garcia Echeverria
Sep 30 – Oct 10 all-day

X is a collaborative exhibition by  Kristen Elizabeth Donoghue-Stanford and Rebecca Garcia Echeverria focused on the theme of femininity and the subversion of the stereotypes that limit it.

Through the exploration of their different and similar experiences, Donoghue-Stanford and Garcia propose to create an abstracted feminine environment that calls upon a shifting perspective of femininity and redefining what it means to exist in the everyday as a woman. The exhibition will exist as a lament to the experiences of women, but also as an expression of gratitude.

(Left) Untitled - Photo Series (Installation View) by Rebecca Garcia Echeverria. (Right) Handheld (Front Detailing), Bronze, 9in x 5 in x 0.3 in by Kristen Elizabeth Donoghue-Stanford

Gallery Hours:

Monday-Thursday, 9am – 4:00pm

Reception Oct 1, 6-8pm

Free admission

Oct
21
Mon
The State of Not Knowing – works on paper by Ernesto Hidalgo and Deanna Gisborne
Oct 21 – Oct 31 all-day

[caption id="attachment_101732" align="aligncenter" width="600"]My Body by Deana Gisborne (2019), 43’ x 39.5’, Graphite on Paper My Body by Deana Gisborne (2019), 43’ x 39.5’, Graphite on Paper[/caption]

The State of Not Knowing is an exhibition works on paper by Ernesto Hidalgo (print media) and Deanna Gisborne (painting & drawing).

Artist statement: Ultimately, a search for our complicated identities is at the heart of our work, whether this is manifested by obscuring the body, multiplying form, collapsing into a writhing vortex or creating dream-like worlds where animals and humans intersect. We try to reconcile contradictions in ourselves, made possible through the unbounded language of art. All of this probing of the self-conscious mind is expressed in bodies, trying from all angles to reach that same conclusion and achieve resolution: Who am I, and how can I grasp this ever-evolving self?  This question is, of course, unanswerable, but we continue this cycle indefinitely, because we are human, and we are curious.

 

Gallery Hours:

Monday-Thursday, 9am – 4:00pm

Free admission

[caption id="attachment_101733" align="aligncenter" width="600"]Felt, by Ernest Hidalgo (2019) Screen print on rag paper; mounted on foamcore. 20” x 28” Felt, by Ernest Hidalgo (2019) Screen print on rag paper; mounted on foamcore. 20” x 28”[/caption]

Nov
4
Mon
Lifelines (Hilda) – solo sculpture and time based art show by Kristen Elizabeth Donoghue-Stanford
Nov 4 – Nov 14 all-day

[caption id="attachment_101740" align="aligncenter" width="700"]Detail from A Lament, by Kristen Elizabeth Donoghue-Stanford, 2019, Acrylic Yarn, 15ft x 5ft x 10ft Detail from A Lament, by Kristen Elizabeth Donoghue-Stanford, 2019, Acrylic Yarn, 15ft x 5ft x 10ft[/caption]

Lifelines (Hilda) is a solo sculpture and time based art installation by Kristen Elizabeth Donoghue-Stanford focused on the theme of lamentation and mourning of someone who is no longer present.

Artist statement: The exhibition will focus around ideas of life, death, loss, and remembrance, interplaying with one another. 87 knitted tubes in neutral colours will be suspended within the gallery space, arranged to create guided pathways and a knitted canvass for video projection.

The installation will be curated in order to showcase a metaphorical image of the lifelines of a particular life; that of a woman named Hilda, whom the footage collected belonged to. 87 knitted tubes will be used within the installation showcasing the number of years Hilda lived until she passed away on January 6th, 2019. The video shows Hilda and her family throughout several years of their lives and will be played on loop throughout the exhibition. A slight distortion will be used in order to hide or blur certain images within the video frame, as well as the projection onto the knitwork will add its own distortion. This is meant to symbolize the memories we don’t always get to keep with us, even when someone has left us.  As one of Hilda’s favourite pastimes and a skill that she passed onto the next generation of her family, the knitwork could not more perfectly summarize the complicated, yet beautiful framework of a life. In this installation we experience the feelings of remembrance and loss and face the concepts of life and death as we witness the lifelines of somebody who is no longer with us through the process of lamenting.  It opens the possibility for reflection and the ability to express gratitude towards such a life.

Gallery Hours:

Monday-Thursday, 9am – 4:00pm

Free admission

Reception: Thursday, November 14, 2019 from 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Nov
16
Sat
Theatre@York presents Goodnight Desdemona (Good Morning Juliet)
Nov 16 – Nov 23 all-day

Coulorful collage featuring a Elizabethan woman on the left, a luminant sky on the right, and a glowing brain in the centre

Goodnight Desdemona (Good Morning Juliet) is a beloved feminist revisioning of two of Shakespeare’s most well-known plays, Othello and Romeo & Juliet. Written by Canadian playwright Ann-Marie MacDonald, the play explores the hypothetical question: what if Shakespeare’s tragedies were actually intended to be comedies? To learn the answer to this question, please join us November 16-23 in the Joseph G. Green Theatre to find out.

Performance Schedule:

Sat, Nov. 16 (preview 1) @ 7:30 pm

Sun. Nov. 17 (preview 2) @ 7:30 pm

Tues. Nov. 19 (Opening) @ 7:30 pm

Wed. Nov. 20 @ 1:00 pm

Wed. Nov. 20 (Relaxed Performance) @ 7:30 pm –Plan your visit

Thurs. Nov. 21@ 7:30 pm

Fri. Nov. 22 @ 1:00 pm

Fri. Nov. 22 @ 7:30pm

Sat. Nov. 23 @ 2:00 pm

Tickets $7- 20

Online Box Office  or call 416-736-5888

Sold-out Show Advisory:  Cash only Rush Seats are usually available at the door for sold out shows. If the show is sold out, please check back as seats may become available.  There is NO GUARANTEE that seats will come available and the timing of seats coming available varies. We recommend booking early & coming early!
Nov
20
Wed
Dance Innovations: the near distance – pathways towards discovery
Nov 20 – Nov 22 all-day

The Department of Dance presents
Dance Innovations 2019 – the near distance – pathways towards discovery

Dance Innovations 2019 – the near distance – pathways towards discovery features the concise creations of 25 fourth year BFA choreographers performed by students engaged in all levels of York’s programs in Dance. Students and faculty involved in creation, performance, lighting design and production collaborate in the successful realization of Dance Innovations. Series A of the two series program comprises a new creation by Assistant Professor and intermedia artist Freya Björg Olafson for York’s third year Performance class. In harmony with the themes explored elsewhere in the Department’s 2019/20 events, performances and workshops – issues of identity, navigation and acknowledgment – our show title celebrates the certainty that curiosity, open ness and creative engagement lead to imminent and ongoing discovery and transformation.

Artistic Director:  Julia Sasso for 4th year choreography course
Director: Freya Björg Olafson for 3rd year Performance course
Production Manager: Jennifer Jimenez

 

PERFORMANCES Nov 20-22
Series A – 7:00 pm
Series B – 8:30 pm

Admission:
Advanced tickets: $12
After November 20: $18

Box Office: 416. 736.5888 | ampd.yorku.ca/boxoffice

Maps & Directions 

 

York University Jazz Festival: Small Ensembles
Nov 20 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

The York University Jazz Festival, running November 18-21, showcases rising young talent directed by leading lights of the Canadian jazz scene.

Catch the next generation of outstanding jazz artists, right here on campus – and with no cover charge!

Wednesday, November 20
7:30-10:00pm
Small ensembles directed by Kevin Turcotte, Jim Vivian and Frank Falco

Admission is free  |  Maps & Directions
Mar
5
Thu
2020 Wendy Michener Lecture: Wafaa Bilal (Performing Change)
Mar 5 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm

The Wendy Michener Memorial Lecture presents Wafaa Bilal (Performing Change)

Wafaa Bilal will discuss specific bodies of work including Domestic Tension (aka Shoot an Iraqi), The Things I Could Tell…, and his most recent project 168:01, elaborating on the evolution of his work and reflecting on his personal experiences living in both the conflict zone of Iraq and the comfort zone of the United States. Bilal’s work explores both the trauma of conflicts and post-conflict relationships through social engagement.

His dynamic, participatory work blends technology and performance to engage viewers in dialogue and places him in the role of the artist as platform initiator, helping to shift and change the distribution channels in the media. The controversial aspects of his work spark deeper conversation and provoke passive viewers to take an active stance with regard to social justice and their own personal/political realities

Location: Tribute Communities Recital Hall
Time: 12:00-2:00pm
Admission is free; all welcome.

The Wendy Michener Lecture, named in commemoration of the Canadian arts critic and journalist, was established at York University in 1986 to provide a forum for discussion of vital issues and developments in culture and the arts.